March 10 preschool storytime will be ‘Magnificent’

February 24, 2017 by  

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Concordia preschoolers are invited to a magnificent storytime at the next “Reading with Friends” at Neighbor to Neighbor.

The book to be read is “The Most Magnificent Thing” and the guest reader will be Margo Hosie of Concordia.

The storytime begins at 10 a.m. Friday, March 10, at the downtown center, 103 E. Sixth St.

In the story by award-winning author and illustrator Ashley Spires, a girl recruits her best friend — a dog — to help make the most magnificent thing. But the project turns out not to be as easy as she thought, and she tries and fails, repeatedly. Finally, she gets so mad she quits. Then it takes her best friend to convince her to try again.

The “Reading with Friends” storytimes are for children ages 3, 4 and 5. Each session includes playtime and a snack, plus children receive a free copy of that day’s book to take home. Parents, grandparents and other caregivers are invited to enjoy coffee and snacks downstairs at the day center for women while the story is being read upstairs.

There is a limit of 30 children per session so parents need to register for each session in advance by calling Neighbor to Neighbor at 785/262-4215 or emailing neighbortoneighbor@csjkansas.org.

The monthly program has been part of Neighbor to Neighbor’s regular offerings since September 2012. The final session for the 2016-17 school year is April 7.

“Reading with Friends” is funded in part by a grant from the Dane G. Hansen Fund, through the Community Foundation for Cloud County.

 

Come sing along with us!

February 13, 2017 by  

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A new offering that provides an innovative combination of onsite
and online formats designed to meet your time demands

You’ve heard the refrain before:
    “Religious life is changing. Large numbers were just an anomaly.  It’s going to be different. The future is very uncertain. Religious life as we know it is dying.”  
Well, we think it’s time to sing a different tune.  We believe that the future of religious life is ours, to live, shape and co-create.  We believe there is a role and purpose for us, women religious of the early 21st century.  
So consider:
        • Do you want to be the author your own life story?
        • Do you want to be an agent of transformation?
        • Do you believe that you can make a difference?
        • Are you tired of just getting by from one day to the next?
        • Have you stopped dreaming or hoping for something more?
        • Does your charism belong in our world’s future?

Now’s your chance to create the community to which you want to belong! We invite you to help write the new story of religious life for women – the story of the life for the post-contemporary generations. Come sing along with us! 

    
Composing a New Song:
Remaking Religious Life in Today’s Desert

This is not a course. We don’t have answers to teach. But we do have a desire to find a way forward.  Together, with you, we can write the new language of hope and intentionality.  It will be a major work, an enduring work that will carry us through the desert of uncertainty and shifting values.  Don’t miss the opportunity to be a part of making a difference!

• For all the DATES & DETAILS, CLICK HERE.

• CLICK HERE to meet the FACILITATORS who will join you on the journey.

• For a two-page Information Sheet that you can download and print, CLICK HERE.

Simple story gives preschoolers a lesson in sharing

February 10, 2017 by  

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SUSIE HAVER

Guest reader Susie Haver seemed to love the story of “Rainbow Fish” as much as her young audience this morning at  Neighbor to Neighbor.

The preschoolers were eager for the monthly installment of  “Reading with Friends” to begin, and Haver complied, bringing the characters to life in the award-winning story by Swiss author and illustrator Marcus Pfiester. With advice from a wise octopus, Rainbow Fish transforms from beautiful but lonely to generous and happy.

In explaining the message of the book, Pfister said, “I want to show our children the positive aspect of sharing,. To share does not only mean to give away something — which is quite hard for a child to do — but to make someone else happy.”

• • • • • • • • • •

The monthly “Reading with Friends” storytimes for children ages 3, 4 and 5. Each session includes playtime and a snack, plus children receive a free copy of that day’s book to take home. 

There is a limit of 30 children per session so parents must register for each session in advance by calling Neighbor to Neighbor at 785/262-4215 or emailing neighbortoneighbor@csjkansas.org. The remaining sessions for the 2016-17 school year are March 10 and April 7.

The monthly program, which has been part of Neighbor to Neighbor’s regular offerings since September 2012, is funded in part by a grant from the Dane G. Hansen Fund, through the Community Foundation for Cloud County.

Register now for free chronic health conditions workshop

February 9, 2017 by  

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Faced with a chronic health condition and the challenge of living a healthy life?

There are still spots available in a seven-week program that will be offered in Concordia to address those challenges.

The registration deadline for the Kansan Self-Management Education program (formerly known as the Kansans Optimizing Health Program) is Feb. 17.

The workshop, which is limited to 20 participants, begins Feb. 23 at Neighbor to Neighbor, 103 E. Sixth St., and will be from 9 to 11:30 a.m. for seven Thursdays. Caregivers, family and friends are encouraged to attend with the person living with a chronic health condition.

There is no charge to take part, and each participant will receive a free copy of the textbook “Living a Healthy Life with a Chronic Condition.”

To register, call Neighbor to Neighbor at 785-262-4215.

The program was developed at Stanford University and designed by the Kansas Health Department. It specifically addresses living with arthritis, diabetes, heart disease and lung disease, but includes all other chronic health issues as well.

Leading the discussion will be Pat Gerhardt and Sister Jean Befort, both of whom live with chronic conditions and who have completed the Health Department training to serve as facilitators. Both women live in Concordia, where Gerhardt is an extension agent with the River Valley District and Befort is co-director of Neighbor to Neighbor.

Topics that will be discussed include:

  • Becoming more physically active safely
  • Making healthy food choices
  • Communicating with family, friends and the health care team
  • Dealing with difficult emotions, frustration and anger
  • Setting and achieving weekly action plans
  • Identifying and solving problems caused by having a chronic condition

People who are interested in the workshop but unable to attend this session should call for more information. Another workshop may be scheduled later in the year, but no dates have been set yet.

 

 

Join the Sisters for Spaghetti Dinner — and more!

February 9, 2017 by  

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Tickets are now available for the 2017 Sisters of St. Joseph Spaghetti Dinner, the biggest event of the year at the Nazareth Motherhouse.

The dinner is set for Sunday, March 12, with serving from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Dinner tickets in advance are $8 for adults and $4 for children ages 5-12, and are available at the Motherhouse, at Manna House of Prayer and at Neighbor to Neighbor. They are also available by calling the Sisters of St. Joseph Development Office, 785-243-211, ext. 1221, or emailing lhansen@csjkansas.org.

Dinner tickets at the door will be $10 for adults and $6 for children. (Children 4 and younger eat free.)

The theme of this year’s spring fundraiser is “A Tour of Italy,” and it features activities for the whole family and performances by local musicians. There will be drawings for prizes of up to $500 cash, a silent auction and the popular “grab bag,” with gifts for $1, $2 and $3. Homemade baked goods and Easter baskets will also be available for sale.

Throughout the event, the Nazareth Gift Shop will be open.

Ticket holders in the drawing decide which prize to try for. This year there are cash prizes of $500, $350 and $250, plus a five-burner CharBroil gas grill, a Keurig coffee maker, a $100 American Express gift card and a quilt handmade by Sister Betty Suther.

Winners will be drawn about 1:30 p.m., but you need not be present to win. Bidding in the silent auction will close at the same time.

In 2016, nearly 600 people attended the sisters’ spaghetti dinner, which raised almost $15,000 to support the Concordia sisters and their ministries.

 

 

 

 

Sisters honor ‘parachute packers’ for years of service

February 7, 2017 by  

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SCROLL DOWN FOR A SLIDESHOW FROM THIS EVENING’S EVENT

Nine employees of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia were honored this evening (Tuesday, Feb. 7) at the 2017 Employee Appreciation Banquet at the Nazareth Motherhouse.

The annual event drew a crowd of nearly 150 employees, their guests and Sisters of St. Joseph. The theme of the evening was “Who Packs Your Parachute?” The theme comes from the story of Charles Plumb, a Vietnam-era Navy pilot who had to eject from his airplane and parachute behind enemy lines. Years later he had the opportunity to meet, and thank, the sailor who had packed his life-saving parachute that day. Today he uses the story in his talks to remind listeners to thank the people who do vital work between the scenes but who might not otherwise he recognized.

Each table was decorated with a miniature person landing with a parachute aloft, designed by Sister Ramona Medina and handcrafted by the women at Neighbor to Neighbor in downtown Concordia. The evening included a welcome by congregational president Sister Jean Rosemarynoski, slideshow with photos of all the employees, numerous door prizes and a meal catered by Marla’s Joy Teahouse in Concordia.

The employees honored, listed with their jobs and length of service, are:

PAULA TATUM
environmental services coordinator
35 years
CURTIS MANSFIELD
maintenance
30 years
DOUG HERMAN
treasurer/chief financial officer
25 years
PENNY ARNOLD
administrative services manager
15 years
LARRY METRO
food services manager/dietician
15 years
MARY BIEKER
charge nurse
5 years
JESICA COLLINS
dietary aide
5 years
FATHER JAMES HOOVER
chaplain
5 years
KEITH SELLS
maintenance
5 years

The Sisters of St. Joseph have about 70 employees in Concordia, working at the Nazareth Motherhouse, Manna House of Prayer and the CSJ Administrative Center at 215 Court St.

 
 

Prayers of unity in this time of transition

February 6, 2017 by  

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Our special thanks to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Orange, Calif., for gathering prayers and reflections as our divided nation begins this time of transition. (The calendar for the remainder of the 100 days will be posted by March 14.)

If you’d like a copy of the March 1-15 calendar to download and print, CLICK HERE.

If you’d like a copy of the February 2017 calendar to download and print, CLICK HERE.

 

If you’d like a copy of the January 2017 calendar to download and print, CLICK HERE.

 

 

 

Quilts? Lace? A spiritual space? Check out Manna House for 2017

February 3, 2017 by  

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Whether you’re looking for a special place to practice your artistry or a peaceful retreat to find your center again, Manna House of Prayer in Concordia will welcome you.

CLICK HERE for the 2017 schedule of Retreats & Workshops at Manna House.

To find out more about the center and its staff, start at our HOME PAGE and click on any of the tabs at the top.

Reader Susie Haver will share ‘The Rainbow Fish’

February 3, 2017 by  

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Concordia preschoolers will learn a lesson in sharing at the next “Reading with Friends” at Neighbor to Neighbor.

The storytime begins at 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 10, at the downtown center, 103 E. Sixth St.

The guest reader for “The Rainbow Fish” will be Susie Haver.

In the award-winning book, Swiss author and illustrator Marcus Pfister tells the story of the Rainbow Fish, who learns to make friends by sharing his most prized possessions. The book was published in German in 1992, with the title “Der Regenbogenfisch,” and translated into English in 1999.

In explaining the message of the book, Pfister said, “I want to show our children the positive aspect of sharing,. To share does not only mean to give away something — which is quote hard for a child to do — but to make someone else happy.”

The “Reading with Friends” storytimes for children ages 3, 4 and 5. Each session includes playtime and a snack, plus children receive a free copy of that day’s book to take home. Parents, grandparents and other caregivers are invited to enjoy coffee and snacks downstairs at the day center for women while the story is being read upstairs.

There is a limit of 30 children per session so parents need to register for each session in advance by calling Neighbor to Neighbor at 785/262-4215 or emailing neighbortoneighbor@csjkansas.org.

The monthly program has been part of Neighbor to Neighbor’s regular offerings since September 2012. The remaining sessions for the 2016-17 school year are March 10 and April 7.

“Reading with Friends” is funded in part by a grant from the Dane G. Hansen Fund, through the Community Foundation for Cloud County.

Students learn more than just sewing with JAG project

February 3, 2017 by  

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Neighborhood Initiatives director Kathleen Norman, left, explains the best way to thread a needle during a JAG-K class at Concordia High School last month, as teacher Jordan Champlin, standing at right, looks on. The students pictured are, left to right at the front table, Zoe Birchalli, Bryan Berglund and Jessica Winters; rear table, Melissaty Sexton; and the table at right, Carson Senner.

 

When Kathleen Norman designed the Sew Creative program for the Sisters of St. Joseph, she had no idea she would find herself in a high school classroom, teaching students to sew.

And when teacher Jordan Champlin dreamed up a sewing project for her “Jobs for American’s Graduates-Kansas” class, she had no idea that Kathleen Norman would be available to provide all the materials and then teach the students how to complete it.

But last month Norman was in Champlin’s classroom at Concordia High School, teaching two classes to create “fidget blankets” that will be donated to Sunset Home for residents there.

“Fidget blankets” are lap-sized mats made of fabrics and materials of various textures.

Fidget blankets, also called activity or sensory quilts, are lap-sized, colorful mats embellished with different textured items like fake fur, corduroy, yard, ribbons, buttons and lace. The idea is to give people with Alzheimer’s and other dementia something to keep their hands busy while occupying their mind to reduce the potential of agitation.

Norman originally contacted Champlin last fall to learn more about JAG-K, an elective offered to seventh- through 12th-graders to teach life and leadership skills. In that conversation, Champlin told her she wanted to have her students learn basic sewing skills and then create fidget blankets as a community service project.

“Given that I already teach basic sewing in Sew Creative, I offered to help her,” says Norman, who serves as director of the sisters’ Neighborhood Initiatives office.

And the students learned more than just basic sewing, Champlin adds. “This has helped them learn the value of working on and finishing a project.”

This was the first project for JAG-K students this year, Champlin said, but in the past they have assisted with food drives and done various volunteer work throughout the community.

JAG-K, which is funded by a grant rather than school district dollars, has been active in Concordia for four years with success in leading students to graduation and on to secondary education, both college and vocational as well as joining the military, Champlin said.

Across Kansas for this school year, there are more than 2,700 students involved in JAG programs in 29 school districts.

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