Creating a greener lifestyle

April 24, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

To learn more about the Sisters of St. Joseph Ecological Integrity Committee, CLICK HERE.

Completely unplug from technology at least one day a month.

 

Building critical thinkers and critical minds

April 21, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

How can 2,000-year-old religious beliefs translate into modern day life?

That is the question Kansas Wesleyan University Professor Phil Meckley, of Salina, put before six students from his honors class entitled “Socrates, Buddha, Confucius, Jesus.” The class is based on the book by the same name which explores the impact that these four historical individuals have had on modern thought.

To help them find answers to that question, they visited the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia at the Nazareth Motherhouse on April 18.


The six students had an opportunity to eat lunch, meet and talk one-on-one with sisters in the Motherhouse, before being taken on a tour of the house by Sister Pat   Eichner. While the beautiful stained-glass windows in the Sacred Heart Chapel and the dramatic Rose Window garnered the students’ admiration, they were equally interested in exploring how modern Sisters actually live and work inside the Motherhouse.

Following the tour, the students sat down with Eichner and Sister Janet Lander for a question and answer session. Discussion ranged from things as mundane as “How do you pay for food?” to the more spiritual, “Was there one specific thing that made you know it was your calling to be a nun?”

Meckley has made a tradition of bringing his class to the Motherhouse each year. This year’s group also visited the Buddhist Temple in Salina earlier in the semester.

For more information on scheduling a tour at the Nazareth Motherhouse, call (785) 243-2113 or email jwahlmeier@csjkansas.org.

Something to talk about

April 19, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

Tori Ehlers uses sign language to engage the children at Neighbor to Neighbor.

The preschoolers who visit Neighbor to Neighbor in Concordia have something new to talk about. Speech pathologist Tori Ehlers has been visiting the playgroup every Wednesday morning in April to entertain and interact with the children.

“Do you guys like Pete the Cat?” Ehlers asked the assembled kids and parents in the playroom. Responses were quick and positive. Ehlers presented the “I Love My White Shoes” book with the use of music, video and printed book. After the presentation the children worked on completing coloring books to reinforce the identification of the different colors that Pete the Cat experienced with his white shoes. As Pete the Cat would say, “It’s all good.”

Previous sessions have featured “Pete’s Pizza” and “The Very Hungry Caterpillar.”
Ehlers, who now works for Cloud County Health Center, has 18 years of experience working with children in school systems. She began work at CCHC at the end of October 2016.

While reading the book, Ehlers often used sign language to help get the message across to her young audience.
“Signing is just another modality to convey language,” Ehlers said. “Especially in the zero to 5 age group when speech might be delayed, signing can help them to not be so frustrated.”
 
Ehlers said she also talks to the mothers in attendance to help the signing carryover into regular life. She will return to Neighbor to Neighbor at 10 a.m. April 26. The interactive book “Push Here” will be featured.

All children from infants to 5 years of age are invited to attend this free event.


For more information about the speech pathology services Ehlers offers, contact the hospital’s rehabilitation department at 243-8514 or email tehlers@srhc.com. For more information about programs offered at Neighbor to Neighbor, call 262-4215, or email neighbortoneighbor@csjkansas.org.

First Sisters of St. Joseph volunteer day a success

April 8, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

There were some dirty jobs to do Saturday in Concordia. Luckily there was a hardworking crew of 14 Concordia students and six sponsors and other adults that gathered early Saturday morning at the Nazareth Motherhouse ready to tackle those tasks.

“This is a good working crew, I tell you what!” Sister Anna Marie Broxterman said as she watched a group of volunteers take on the backbreaking work of hauling wheelbarrows full of mulch into the Concordia Community Garden of Hope. “These kids have been fun!”

The community garden was just one of the beneficiaries of the volunteer assistance. Volunteers aided with projects at Manna House of Prayer, North Mound and nine private residences in Concordia.

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia organized the volunteer day to help people in Concordia that needed assistance with yard work, light housework and removal of bagged trash. Those needing help were asked to fill out an application form at the Concordia Senior Citizens Center with priority given to those with physical limitations, including the elderly and people with disabilities.

“This is the first time we’ve ever done it,” said Laura Hansen, Administrative Assistant of Development and new Volunteer Program Coordinator with the Sisters of St. Joseph. “I was really impressed with how hard these kids worked. They were so great. They just came because they wanted to help out. They had such great attitudes and work ethic.”

Concordia FFA sponsor Krystal Nelson and JAG teacher Jordan Champlin coordinated with their students to volunteer at the event. A National Honor Society student and other interested adults in the community rounded out the crew. Workers were kept hydrated with bottled water donated by Farm Bureau, Cloud County Co-op, Concordia Auto Mart and Central National Bank. Some volunteers stayed hard at work until noon. Lunch was provided.

“People really appreciated the assistance,” Hansen said. “They were so thrilled that we would do this. I must have heard ‘thank you’ 50 times today.”

She said that none of the projects were overwhelming, but were things that could be difficult for elderly or disabled residents to do on their own, such as raking out flower beds, moving large or heavy items to the curb for removal and picking up downed limbs.

Guest reader delivers a good time and a Gruffalo

April 7, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

Ask any entertainer about how to capture an audience and they’ll tell you it’s all in the delivery. But having good material doesn’t hurt, either.

Ron Elniff, of Concordia, had both this morning as he took on the challenge of entertaining a room full of active preschoolers as the latest guest reader in the monthly Reading with Friends story time series at Neighbor to Neighbor in downtown Concordia.

Before the longtime school psychologist started in on the featured book, “The Gruffalo,” he gave the young readers tips on how to let books help them travel to distant and imaginary places.

“How would a mouse talk? High or low?” he asked the children. After a chorus of answers, Elniff advised the group, “You can make your story come alive if you use a different tone of voice for the different characters.”

“Like in animation?” one of the kids asked. Elniff agreed.

And he proceeded to do just that as he used  his voice to make the plucky mouse and the burly Gruffalo jump to life from the pages of the book. The story, by author Julia Donaldson with illustrations by Axel Scheffler, is an international best-seller with more than 13.5 million copies in print worldwide. It was voted England’s favorite bedtime story. The children received a free copy of “The Gruffalo” to take home.

The “Reading with Friends” story times are for children ages 3, 4 and 5. Each session includes playtime and a snack, as well as a book. Parents, grandparents and other caregivers may stay downstairs at the day center for women to enjoy coffee and snacks – but many choose to join their small charges upstairs to listen to the story.

The monthly program has been part of Neighbor to Neighbor’s regular offerings since September 2012. This was the final session for the 2016-17 school year. This year’s Reading with Friends series was funded in part by a grant from the Dane G. Hansen Fund, through the Community Foundation for Cloud County.

Sister Pat McLennon, a co-director of Neighbor to Neighbor, said that the group hopes to secure another grant to allow them to continue the popular program next year.

“We don’t have a grant yet,” she said. “But if we do get one we will start the program again in September.”

For more information on Reading with Friends, contact Neighbor to Neighbor at 785/262-4215 or email neighbortoneighbor@csjkansas.org.

 

April 2017 edition of The Messenger is bursting with news!

April 6, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

Our April 2017 edition of The Messenger goes in the mail today, but you can read it here before it arrives in your mailbox. And you may want to get an early start; this spring issue is 16 pages jam-packed full of news about immigration, our ministries and upcoming events!

To open the flipbook edition, just click on the image below:

CSJ Associates renew commitment during retreat

March 28, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

CSJ Associates making their first or renewing their commitment at the annual CSJ Associates Retreat. Front row (left to right): Nancy Welsh, Stephanie Hudson, Joelyn Foy, Susan Riordan. Back row: Gerry Parker, Jennifer Spangler, Rosalita Flax, Catherine Seitz, Susan LeDuc, Mary Ray. Far back: Bill Riordan. Not pictured Vicki Appelhans

As part of the annual CSJ Associates Retreat, a new Associate made her first commitment Saturday while 11 other Associates renewed their commitment to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia. The spring weekend retreat took place March 24 to 26 at Manna House of Prayer in Concordia.

The 7 p.m. commitment ceremony was the highlight of a weekend filled with prayer and fellowship. The retreat concluded with Mass on Sunday morning at the Nazareth Motherhouse and dinner with the Sisters.

A CSJ Associate is a Christian adult who is committed to Gospel values, feels drawn by the charism, spirituality and mission of the Sisters of St. Joseph, desires to deepen one’s spiritual life, is willing to give oneself in service to the “dear neighbor” and is committed to building community. CSJ Associates are men and women from all ages and all walks of life. They meet regularly for prayer and sharing either in groups or one-on-one.

CSJ Associates renewing their commitment at the retreat were:

  • Susan LeDuc, Concordia-area group
  • Bill Riordan, Concordia-area group      
  • Susan Riordan, Concordia-area group
  • Gerry Parker, Abilene-area group
  • Vicki Appelhans, Manhattan-area group
  • Mary Ray, Manhattan-area group
  • Catherine Seitz, Manhattan-area group
  • Nancy Welsh, Manhattan-area group
  • Stephanie Hudson, Kansas City-area group
  • Jennifer Spangler, Kansas City-area group
  • Rosalita Flax, Western Kansas-area group

Joelyn Foy Ph.D., Manhattan-area group, made her first commitment. Other Associates have or will be renewing at area group meetings.

Also taking part in the weekend retreat were several Sisters of St. Joseph and two women who wanted to learn more about the CSJ Associates program. For more information about CSJ Associates, contact CSJ Associate Catherine Seitz at sdseitz@cox.net or Sister Janet Lander, janetmarycsj@yahoo.com or call 785/243-2149 or visit www.csjkansas.org/about/associates/ .

Currently, there are Associate members in Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arkansas and Missouri.

Special thanks to Sister Kathy Schaefer, who provided photos of Saturday’s events.

Motherhouse indoor pool used for Red Cross lifeguard training

March 27, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

Anne Abbott, left, poses with her Red Cross lifeguard training class on their last swim of the course in the Nazareth Motherhouse pool.

Summer means swimming. And swimming means the need for lifeguards. But where does a community find lifeguards?

The Red Cross has an answer. Anne Abbott, of Kensington, has been busy for the past two weekends training new lifeguards at the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia Motherhouse indoor pool. This class wrapped up on Sunday.

Students from Concordia and Belleville logged in at least 27 hours of class time and pool time to prepare for working in area community swimming pools this summer. Future lifeguards in the class ranged in age from 15 to 19. Fifteen is the minimum age to train for Red Cross lifeguard certification.

The Nazareth Motherhouse offers an indoor pool and meeting rooms which makes it ideal for advance training during chilly weather. Abbott teaches the course two to three times a year. Red Cross swimming classes are well-known in the community.

“Everyone uses the ‘Learn to Swim’ classes for younger swimmers,” Abbott said. “The lifeguard certificate is nationally and internationally recognized.”

Anyone interested in lifeguard certification training should contact their local Red Cross.

Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia plan volunteer day April 8

March 26, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia are organizing a volunteer day on Saturday, April 8, to help people in Concordia that need assistance with yard work, light housework and removal of bagged trash.

Individuals, groups or organizations interested in volunteering are encouraged to contact Laura Hansen, Administrative Assistant of Development and new Volunteer Program Coordinator with the Sisters of St. Joseph, at (785) 243-2113 ext. 1221 or lhansen@csjkansas.org. Volunteers will meet at 8 a.m. Saturday in the east parking lot at the Nazareth Motherhouse, 1300 Washington St. Clean-up supplies will be provided, but volunteers are encouraged to bring work gloves and to wear work clothes and closed-toed shoes.

Those needing assistance were asked to fill out an application form at the Concordia Senior Citizens Center by March 31. Priority was given to those with physical limitations, including the elderly and people with disabilities.

The volunteer day will precede the City of Concordia’s planned Spring Clean-Up for residential areas during the week of April 10-14 .

‘The Gruffalo’ to be featured story for April’s ‘Reading with Friends’

March 20, 2017 by  

Print pageEmail page

Young readers will have a rollicking good time as they root for an enterprising mouse who makes up a terrifying monster — a gruffalo — to scare off would-be bullies.  The children’s story “The Gruffalo” will be featured at  the next “Reading with Friends” on Friday, April 7. 

The cheerful, rhyming text will lead Concordia preschoolers through the forest as the tale of the imaginary gruffalo becomes more and more menacing. Soon all of the mouse’s tormentors are scared away. The mouse scoffs at them, for everyone knows “There’s no such thing as a gruffal… .” But a turn of the page reveals — you guessed it — a gruffalo, that thinks the mouse will “… taste good on a slice of bread.” Undaunted, the rodent devises a plan to frighten the monster off. 

The story, by author Julia Donaldson with illustrations by Axel Scheffler, is an international best-selling and award-winning sensation with more than 13.5 million copies in print worldwide. It has been made into an Oscar-nominated animated film and a stage musical that was performed on Broadway. It was voted England’s favorite bedtime story. Ron Elniff of Concordia will be the guest reader.

The “Reading with Friends” monthly story times for children ages 3, 4 and 5 begin at 10 a.m. at Neighbor to Neighbor, 103 E. Sixth St. Each session includes playtime and a snack, plus children receive a free copy of that day’s book to take home. Parents, grandparents and other caregivers are invited to enjoy coffee and snacks downstairs at the day center for women while the story is being read upstairs.

There is a limit of 30 children per session so parents need to register for each session in advance by calling Neighbor to Neighbor at 785/262-4215 or mailing neighbortoneighbor@csjkansas.org.

The monthly program has been part of Neighbor to Neighbor’s regular offerings since September 2012. This is the final session for the 2016-17 school year.

“Reading with Friends” is funded in part by a grant from the Dane G. Hansen Fund, through the Community Foundation for Cloud County.

Next Page »