Praying During a Pandemic

June 26, 2020 by  

On online retreat via Zoom

Retreat Director: Dr. Catherine Michaud, CSJ

July 26-Aug. 1, 2020

Opening session: 6:30 p.m. Sunday, July 26. Daily sessions: 9:30 a.m. Monday-Saturday.

This retreat is about living through a pandemic whose ripple effects are seismic — globally, internationally, nationally, locally, humanly, personally, financially, politically, socially, psychologically and spiritually.

For the first time in human history everyone on planet Earth is subjected to a common threat. Chaos looms. In chaos theory, a small change can have massive, unpredictable consequences. Our choices and attitudes in a crisis like this one are enormously significant.

This retreat calls us to contemplate our experiences during the pandemic and to consider our choices from here on. We will, as we rest in the arms of our Creator, (1) feel the pain of the pandemic, find hope and locate joy within the struggle; (2) marvel in a new kind of silence (even the birds are loving it!); (3) attune ourselves to “invisible things”: contagion — some kinds are deadly and some life-giving; (4) reflect on our “lives all together” in a sudden strangeness — Beatitudes for a pandemic; (5) grieve (That discomfort feeling is grief); (6) Celebrate Jubilee — After the trouble has passed; (7) Pause for integration.

For information/registrations: Contact Manna House of Prayer, P.O. Box 675, Concordia, KS 66901, (785)243-4428 or email retreatcenter@mannahouse.org.

Cost is $200.

Note: Retreatants must have access to the internet for Zoom and email to participate in the retreat.

(art: Koinonia — Living in a Cave)

Sister Elizabeth (Beth) Stover — Oct. 16, 1941 – June 7, 2020

June 8, 2020 by  

Sister Elizabeth (Beth) Stover died June 7 at Cloud County Health Center in Concordia, Kansas. She was 78 years old and a Sister of St. Joseph for 60 years. She was born in Beloit, Kansas, on Oct. 16, 1941, to Paul and Marie Grennan Stover, the youngest of five children, and was baptized Margaret Elizabeth. She entered the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia, Kansas, on Sept. 8, 1959. On March 19, 1960, Beth received the habit of the Sisters of St. Joseph and was given the name Sister Ellen Dolora. Later, she went back to her baptismal name of Beth. She pronounced first vows on March 19, 1961, and final vows on March 19, 1966.

In 1964, Sister Beth received a B.A. in chemistry from Marymount College, Salina, Kansas, followed by a M.A. in hospital administration from St. Louis University in 1975. Sister Beth served as a medical technologist and lab supervisor at St. Joseph’s Hospital, Concordia, from 1965-1971. From 1975-1987 Sister Beth served as administrator of St. Joseph’s Hospital in Concordia. Sister Beth was elected as Vice President of the Congregation from 2008-2012; and served on the Leadership Council from 2012-2016. She retired to the Motherhouse in 2016.

Sister Beth was preceded in death by her parents and two sisters. She is survived by her sisters, Mary Ellen Truex, Odessa, Texas, and Jane Morch, Wichita, Kansas. A Bible Vigil Service will be held at 9:30 a.m. on June 11 with Sisters Margaret Nacke and Mary Savoie as the eulogists. The Mass of Christian Burial will be at 11 a.m. on June 11 with Father Barry Brinkman presiding.

Due to the safety precautions for Covid-19, the bible vigil and funeral mass will be private. However, both will be livestreamed on the Sisters of St. Joseph Facebook page. The burial will be in the Nazareth Motherhouse Cemetery. Chaput-Buoy Mortuary, 325 W. Sixth St., Concordia, is in charge of arrangements. Memorials for Sister Beth Stover may be given to the Sisters of St. Joseph Health Care/Retirement Fund or the Apostolic Works of the Sisters; P.O Box 279, Concordia, KS 66901.

To make an online donation in Sister Beth Stover’s memory, click on the button below:

DonateNow 

Sisters of St. Joseph stand against racism

June 3, 2020 by  

We, Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia, Kansas, cry out against the unjust murder of George Floyd by police officer Derek Chauvin. His use of unnecessary deadly force against an unarmed man, who is Black, speaks volumes about the blatant racism so obvious in our nation.

In addition, we stand in support of the nonviolent protests that are happening across the nation. This cry for justice for George Floyd and People of Color who have been victimized by police or other entities calls for radical change in many systems that we have grown accustomed to in the US. It also calls for laws to limit the unnecessary use of force by police officers, as well as hold them accountable before the law.

We join with all Sisters of St. Joseph in the United States in support of our common statement: http://cssjfed.org/sites/default/files/2020-06/Statement on Racism.pdf

We also stand with religious women across the United States in their statement: https://lcwr.org/me…/news/lcwr-condemns-killing-george-floyd

As daughters and sons of God, we claim anew our brothers and sisters as our dearest neighbors. We renew our commitment to address our own racism and that of this nation as well.

Sincerely, Leadership Council
Sisters Jean Rosemarynoski, Therese Blecha, Mary Jo Thummel, Marilyn Wall and Janet Lander

Justice & Peace Coordinators
Sisters Chris Meyer and Judy Stephens
Date: June 3, 2020

Discover Camp Bingo!

April 30, 2020 by  

 

Discover Camp 2020 BINGO

One of the many activities that we do during Discover Camp is to play Bingo with the Sisters. Though we are not able to have the game in person, we invite you to join us in playing BINGO! (this game is only open to the young women to applied for Discover Camp)

Remember a winning BINGO is considered five in a row …. either across, down or diagonal

Beginning on the Feast of St. Joseph the Worker …. May 1 through May 13 — the Feast Day of Our Lady of Fatima — we will post Bingo Clues here.

Find the answer on your Bingo card and CIRCLE it on your card!

May 1st

  • One God, three Divine Persons.
  • In the Book of Revelation, God says, “I am the ____ and the Omega, the first and the last.” meaning that God remains from the beginning to the end of time.

May 2

  • The animal that is often associated with Jesus.
  • Christian who is called to care and serve others.

May 3

  • The Bishop of Rome
  • The liturgical season we are currently in.

May 4

  • April 19, 2020 was Divine ______ Sunday.
  • The Holy Spirit is often depicted as this.

May 5

  • In all Roman Catholic Churches one of these is in a prominent place.
  • The Patron Saint of teenage girls.

May 6

  • The Sacrament in which we become members of the Body of Christ.
  • Protector of the Holy Family and the Patron Saint of the Universal Church.

May 7

  • Women who makes the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.
  • A habit that perfects the powers of the soul and disposes you to do good

May 8

  • An independent state within the city of Rome, ruled by the Pope.
  • We celebrate the season of Easter for _____ days.

May 9

  • Catholic devotions, wherein the heart of Jesus is viewed as a symbol of “God’s boundless and passionate love for mankind”
  • “For me, prayer is a surge of the heart; it is a simple look turned toward heaven, it is a cry of recognition and of love, embracing both trial and joy.”

May 10 

  • Title for Mary because her son Jesus is both God and man.
  • When conferring the Sacrament of Confirmation the Bishop says “Be Sealed with the __________________.” 
  • Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.

May 11

  • Number of years the Israelites wandered in the desert.
  • A Franciscan saint who suffered with the stigmata.

May 12

  • Jesus changing water into wine
  • Sacrament in which a man is ordained a deacon, priest and bishop.

 

Remember to do one of the Dear Neighbor Deeds!

Let’s Play Bingo!

 

 
If you want a better idea of what the experience is all about, below we have a five-minute video recapturing our three days of extraordinary adventure at the Nazareth Motherhouse in 2018!

Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia closed to visitors

March 16, 2020 by  

Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia will be closing to visitors

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia are taking the following measures to prevent our sisters, employees and the public from becoming infected with the COVID-19 virus that is spreading throughout the world.

  • Effective immediately, no visitors may enter the Nazareth Motherhouse. This includes patrons who use the Motherhouse swimming pool.
  • All programming at Manna House of Prayer has been canceled until further notice.
  • There will be no public masses at the Sacred Heart Chapel at the Nazareth Motherhouse.
  • All programs at Neighbor to Neighbor in Concordia have been canceled and N2N will be closed for as long as Concordia public schools are closed.
  • Anyone seeking assistance from the Helping Hands ministry at Manna House of Prayer should call ahead at (785) 243-4428 and ask for Susan LeDuc or Cecilia Thrash to make an appointment to address their needs. There will be no walk-ins.

The Sisters of St. Joseph are actively doing their part in curtailing the spread of this disease. We will keep you updated on any changes to the policy. Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia honors employees

February 26, 2020 by  

Pam Huber

Carlene Edwards

Vicky Thoman

Susan LeDuc

Sheri Krause

Katy Brown

Joy Bliss

Barbara Kortman

Tina Goff

Cindy Dunlap

Kim Brownell

Mary Walker

 

 

 

 

Twelve employees of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia were honored
Feb. 25 at the 2020 Employee Appreciation Banquet at the Nazareth
Motherhouse.

The annual event drew a large crowd of employees, guests and Sisters of St. Joseph to the auditorium in the Nazareth Motherhouse.

The theme of the evening was “Mardi Gras,” with each beautifully
decorated table highlighted with fanciful Mardi Gras decorations made by
Sister Ramona Medina with help from volunteers.

Sister Jean Rosemarynoski, president of the Sisters of St. Joseph of
Concordia, opened the evening using the Mardi Gras theme.
“Our theme for our dinner this year is Mardi Gras. Mardi
Gras is hundreds of years old and has a rich tradition,” Sister Jean
said. “Chris Rose is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, and after
Hurricane Katrina where the people of New Orleans really needed Mardi
Gras, Chris Rose wrote that Mardi Gras is the love of life. It is the
harmonic convergence of our food, our music, our eccentricities, our
neighborhoods, our creativity and our joy of living all coming together
at once.”

“And Chris Rose goes on to say Mardi Gras has many life lessons to teach
us. And that of the many he mentions I found two to be the most
important. The first is to be neighborly and to be patient,” Sister Jean
said. “The second is team building. That is why we chose this theme. I
often tell a story that goes along with the theme, but tonight, you are
the story. That the lessons of Mardi Gras: the hospitality, the team
building, the helping one another … you are the story. You live the
story of Mardi Gras.”

“You are the living example of the very best of Mardi Gras. So we
celebrate all of you,” Sister Jean said. “And as I’ve told you before,
but I cannot say it often enough, we not only believe, but we know we
have Concordia’s very finest. We are humbled and grateful that out of
all the employers in this area, you chose us.”

Sister Marilyn Wall led the assembly in prayer. Sister Mary Jo Thummel
acted as master of ceremonies conducting drawing prizes throughout the
night.

The employees honored, listed with their length of service, are:
Vicky Thoman, 40 years
Susan LeDuc, 30 years
Carlene Edwards, 25 years
Joy Bliss, 20 years
Barbara Kortman, 15 years
Tina Goff, 10 years
Pam Huber, 10 years
Sheri Krause, 10 years
Mary Walker, 10 years
Kim Brownell, 10 years
Cindy Dunlap, 5 years
Katy Brown, 5 years

In addition to the elegant meal provided by the Nazareth Motherhouse
food service staff under the direction of Larry Metro, door prizes were
randomly drawn throughout the night for baked goods, gift certificates
to local eateries and bowl warmers.

A PowerPoint slide presentation showed photos of all the honorees at
work, while various sisters spoke to how each of the employees are
appreciated for their contributions to the workplace.

Vicky Thoman, the 40-year honoree, was particularly mentioned as this
being her first job out of high school … and her only job since then!

The Sisters of St. Joseph have about 70 employees in Concordia, working
at the Nazareth Motherhouse, Manna House of Prayer and the CSJ
Administrative Center at 215 Court St.

Lenten studies series temporarily suspended at Manna House of Prayer

February 20, 2020 by  

This series, along with other programming at Manna House of Prayer has been temporarily suspended due to precautions for the COVID-19 virus. Please follow this page, or the Manna House of Prayer Facebook page for more information on when programming will resume.

 

What are you giving up for Lent? A common question every year. But this year, have you thought about what you want to acquire to help you understand and appreciate Lent?
The Manna House of Prayer in Concordia is offering a six-part series during Lent, open to everyone of any denomination, or even no denomination at all. The series begins on March 4 and continues through the Lenten season ending April 8.
Each session is presented by a different sister of St. Joseph of Concordia. Everyone is invited to attend and join in a lively discussion during the Lenten series.
Each session is $10, or $50 for all six sessions. Contact Manna House of Prayer at (785) 243-4428 or email retreatcenter@mannahouse.org.
MARCH 4, 2020
Lenten Series Week 1 – Knowing Jesus
Presenter: Mary Jo Thummel, CSJ
Let’s take a journey in the life of Jesus.  Who is Jesus to each of us?  How do we come to relate with Jesus more deeply?  What does the life of Jesus say to how we live our own lives?  Wednesday evening, 7:00-8:00 p.m.  Cost: $10 or $50 for all 6 sessions.

MARCH 11, 2020
Lenten Series Week 2 – God’s Purpose for our Lives and Our Deepest Desire
Presenter: Janet Lander, CSJ
Do you want to follow Christ? What does that mean in these times, in our ordinary lives? Can we really know and do God’s will? Wednesday evening, 7:00-8:00 p.m.  Cost: $10 or $50 for all 6 sessions.

MARCH 18, 2020
Lenten Series Week 3 – Something’s Broken
Presenter: Sr. Gilla Dubé CSJ
Life is difficult and at times unfair and confusing. In our vulnerable moments, it seems easy to make choices that do not bring healing. Regardless of the choices we make, God loves us deeply and responds to the broken parts of our lives with love and forgiveness and desires that we do the same. Wednesday evening, 7:00-8:00 p.m. Cost: $10 or $50 for all 6 sessions.

MARCH 25, 2020
Lenten Series Week 4 – Finding God in All Things
Presenter: Jean Ann Walton, CSJ
We can find God in all things, in the storm and in the calm, in the laughter and in the tears, in friends and in enemies, even in a can of worms.  So how can we do this? Wednesday evening, 7:00-8:00 p.m. Cost: $10 or $50 for all 6 sessions.

APRIL 1, 2020
Lenten Series Week 5 – Suffering Jesus
Presenter:  Pat Eichner, CSJ
Reflecting on Jesus’ suffering leads us to know him more intimately, to love him more dearly and to follow him more closely.  Wednesday evening, 7:00-8:00 p.m. Cost: $10 or $50 for all 6 sessions.

APRIL 8, 2020
Lenten Series Week 6 – God’s Love and our Response
Presenter: Betty Suther, CSJ
As we contemplate Jesus’ resurrection, we collaborate with God’s action in the world.  How do we integrate prayer and service, contemplation in action?  What is God calling me to do, to be?  Wednesday evening, 7:00-8:00 p.m. Cost: $10 or $50 for all 6 sessions.

Sisters of St. Joseph welcome community for open house

December 9, 2019 by  

It was standing room only for a while as families packed the Nazareth Motherhouse auditorium for the annual Christmas Open House on Dec. 8. Beautiful weather and the return of last year’s popular Santa and Mrs. Claus — who on other days are known as Dell Lee and Annette Boswell of Leon, Iowa — led to some long lines through the auditorium. Santa and Mrs. Claus posed for photos with all the children during the free event.

Many Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia were on hand to serve ice-cold milk and punch and a selection of Christmas cookies to the crowds waiting to meet Santa.
“I think we served more than 450 cookies,” Larry Metro, food service supervisor for the Sisters of St. Joseph, said. The iced, sugar cookies were a definite hit.

Other Sisters directed guests through the historic Motherhouse so that visitors could view the Heritage Center and Christmas decorations.

Some people might wonder why a convent would offer a visit with Santa, said President Jean Rosemarynoski, CSJ.

“We do it for several reasons. Many young families have not met religious sisters and this is an opportunity for a short visit with sisters, a tour of the Motherhouse and to learn more about us,” Sister Jean said. “There were adults who toured our new Heritage Room and afterward sought out a specific sister whose story they read to learn more about her and her work. That provided for a wonderful conversation!”

“Having Santa at the Motherhouse also provides a no-cost, fun experience between parents and children. There are coloring sheets for the kids and parents sit with them at the table,” Sister Jean said. “Many parents and grandparents were appreciative of having a place to share this experience with their children in a relaxed, welcoming environment.”

“Everyone had so much fun! Most of the kids were overjoyed to see Santa and Mrs. Claus but there were a few that were a little unsure,” said Ambria Gilliland, assistant director of development for the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia. “We had a great crowd! The sisters truly enjoyed interacting with the kids. Santa and Mrs. Claus are such good sports. Santa even traded hats with a little boy and had fun trying to coax a smile from the kids by getting them to say ‘Pepsi’ instead of the usual ‘Cheese!’”

This year’s event also offered a drawing for a free door prize.

The door prize was a hand-crafted wooden sign with the words “O come let us adore him” and a manger painted on it. It had battery-operated lights that looked like stars in the night sky. Danielle Haskett, of Concordia, was the lucky winner.

“I was so happy with the crowd we had,” Gilliland said. “Seeing the joy on the kids’ faces truly made the whole event worth the work.”

Obituary for Karma Imogen Smith-Grindell, CSJ Associate

November 25, 2019 by  

Karma Imogen Smith-Grindell passed peacefully in the early morning hours of Nov. 13, 2019, after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease.

Karma was born Nov. 28, 1940, in Columbus, Ohio, at 1:14 p.m. When first measured days after birth, she weighed 3 lbs. 10.5 oz. Her estimated birth weight was 3 lbs. 13 oz. She was born about 6 weeks early, and her twin brother who preceded her in birth died shortly after her arrival. She was not expected to survive, but defied the odds and returned to the home of her mother and father, Margaret Hayes Smith and Laban Conrad Smith, on Dec. 31, 1940. Her name was a testament to her birth story: Karma (Sanskrit — “Destiny”) Imogen (Greek — “Beloved child”) and (Gaelic — “Maiden”).

Karma’s younger brother, Hartman, was born in 1944. Karma’s father was a Navy officer, and the family relocated numerous times during her childhood for his postings. Her homes included Auburn, Ala., Galveston, Texas and the Canal Zone, Panama. She remembered with particular fondness the years in Panama. The family eventually settled in Terre Haute, Ind., where her father was a professor of English at Indiana State University. They enjoyed summers at family farms in Wisconsin, and had a litany of pets, including several dogs, ducks and chickens.

After graduating from Wiley High School in 1957, Karma spent a summer in France as a camp counselor. She then attended the University of Michigan where she earned a bachelor’s degree in English. She entered Harvard graduate school in 1962, where she was re-acquainted with her high school debate partner, Michael LR Donnelly, who would become her first husband.

They were married in 1964, and had two children: Anna Callysta was born in Boston in 1966, and Maxwell Conor was born in Madison, Wis., in 1969. The family would move to Manhattan, Kan., in 1972. Karma worked at Kansas State University as director of the English as a Second Language program, and was a doting and attentive mother. After the dissolution of her first marriage in 1981, Karma stayed in Manhattan for several years, then lived in Concordia, Kan., where she became an ecumenical member of the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia. Although not Catholic herself, Karma remained a committed and active participant in the CSJ Associates for decades thereafter. She also lived briefly in Pendle Hill, Penn., at a Quaker community.

After leaving academia in 1983, Karma became a Licensed Practical Nurse, providing hospice and home care to elderly residents in the farm country surrounding Manhattan, Kan. She later added skills in massage and energy work (shiatzu and jin shin jyutsu) which she applied generously to any who suffered the slings and arrows of physical or emotional injury. Fascinated by human psychology and the puzzles of our inner beings, Karma was for many years a learned practitioner of the Enneagram personality system, and an active participant in the vibrant international community of Enneagram students.

Karma married the love of her life, Rob Grindell, on July 8, 1989. For more than a decade, Rob and Karma traveled the world and reveled in the joys of each others’ company. Destinations included many of our United States by small plane (Rob piloting, Karma navigating), Greece, Mexico, Canada, Belize, Hawaii and Europe. Karma also made a memorable solo trip to Leh, Ladakh, as a participant in an international Buddhist women’s conference. Karma spent much of her adult life pursuing spiritual growth, and considered herself a Quaker catholic Zen Buddhist (lowercase “c” intentional).

After a long battle with cancer, Rob passed away on Dec. 19, 2000. Karma remained in Manhattan until 2006, where she was a beloved member of multiple spiritual communities. In 2006, she packed house and home and moved to Colorado Springs, where her brother Hartman and his wife Nancy lived. She continued to travel extensively, including many trips to California to visit her daughter Anna and grandchildren Maya and Dante. Her son Max’s family — wife Kelly and daughters Claire and Caroline — were blessed to have her nearby, and she was a frequent short-term guest in their household in Littleton, Colo., where the resident dogs would celebrate her arrival with wags and kisses.

Throughout her life, Karma was beloved by her community and friends as an individual who personified kindness. Alzheimer’s never robbed her of her inherently sweet and loving disposition, and to the end her caregivers adored her.

She is survived by her brothers Hartman and Nancy Smith of Jacksonville, Fla., and brother Forrest and Shiela Smith of Terre Haute, Ind.; her children Maxwell and Kelden Donnelly of Littleton, Colo., Anna and Burman Deshautelle of Agoura Hills, Calif., and Michael Grindell and Jennifer Grindell of Atlanta, Ga.; and grandchildren Claire, Caroline, Dante, Maya, Maclean, Samantha and Grace (all over the place).

A service in Karma’s memory will be held in the spring in Manhattan, Kan.

In lieu of flowers, please direct donations in Karma’s memory to Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia, P.O Box 279, Concordia, KS 66901.

To make an online donation in Karma’s memory, click on the button below:

DonateNow 

Sister Lucy Schneider — Jan. 15, 1927 – Nov. 10, 2019

November 11, 2019 by  

Sister Lucy Schneider died Nov. 10, 2019 at Mount Joseph Senior Village in Concordia, Kan. She was 92 years old and a Sister of St. Joseph of Concordia for 70 years.

She was born in rural Salina, Kan., on Jan. 15, 1927, to John and Lucy Seramur Schneider, the youngest of six children, and was baptized Agnes Adele. She entered the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia on Sept. 8, 1948. On March 19, 1949, Agnes received the habit of the Sisters of St. Joseph and was given the name Sister Lucy. She pronounced first vows on March 19, 1950, and final vows on March 19, 1953.

In 1948 Sister Lucy earned a B.A. in English from Marymount College, Salina. In 1956 she received a M.A. in English from Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. She then received a Ph.D. in English from Notre Dame University in 1967. She taught in institutions staffed by the Sisters of St. Joseph in Grand Island, Neb., Concordia, Manhattan and Salina. She also taught on the Indian reservation in Pine Ridge, South Dakota. In 1991 Sister Lucy retired from teaching and served the community in various positions at the Motherhouse. Music played a vital role in Sister Lucy’s life as she wrote many song parodies for special occasions.

Sister Lucy was preceded in death by her parents, three sisters, and one brother. One sister, Mary Elizabeth Ryan, survives. A Bible Vigil Service will be held 7 p.m. Nov. 12 in the Sacred Heart Chapel in the Nazareth Motherhouse with Sister Betty Suther as the eulogist. The Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10:30 a.m. Nov. 13 in the Motherhouse Chapel with Rev. Bob Schneider and Rev. Barry Brinkman presiding.

The burial will be in the Nazareth Motherhouse Cemetery. Chaput-Buoy Mortuary, 325 W. Sixth St., Concordia, is in charge of arrangements. Memorials for Sister Lucy Schneider may be given to the Sisters of St. Joseph Health Care/ Retirement Fund or the Apostolic Works of the Sisters; P.O. Box 279, Concordia, KS 66901.

To make an online donation in Sister Lucy Schneider’s memory, click on the button below:

DonateNow 

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