Sister Margaret Nacke — 60 years

December 31, 2013 by

web-MargaretNacke-2-DSC_2863-copy-2PARENTS:  Albert J. and Frederica M. Haug Nacke
HOMETOWN: Hebron, Neb.
RECEIVED INTO CONGREGATION:  March 19, 1954
RELIGIOUS NAME: Sister Jeanne d’Arc
EDUCATION:
Marymount College, Salina (bachelor’s degree in art); Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. (master’s of fine arts); University of Toronto/Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (master’s in adult education, doctorate in adult life transitions); Immaculate Heart College, Los Angeles;  and University of North Carolina in Raleigh.
MISSIONS:
1950s   St. Xavier Elementary School, Junction City, Kan., and Sacred Heart High School, Salina; teaching
1962-1976   Marymount College; teacher for art and art history; chaired art department; initiated and chaired the Division of Continuing Education.
1981-1984   Started Life Planning & Resource Service, based in Concordia
1984-1987   Established Pallotti Center, Kansas City, Mo.
1987-1990   Christian Foundation for Children & Aging, Kansas City, Mo.; gave talks and traveled to many countries in which CFCA had volunteers and projects
1990-1993   Cathedral Square Towers/Nowlin Hall, Kansas City, Mo., developed program for residents;  worked at Christ the King Parish developing programs for adults
1993-present   Eastern European endeavor – made numerous trips to Eastern Europe to collaborate with sisters; facilitated workshops and conferences; funded documentary “Interrupted Lives: Catholic Sisters Under European Communism;” established archive at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago.
2007-present   Pastoral ministry in Belleville, Munden, Cuba, Kan. Churches (living in Belleville, Kan.)
2008-present   Counter trafficking work — organized U.S. Catholic Sisters United Against Human Trafficking and created the Bakhita Initiative website

“Every age is a good age if you know what to do with it,” according to T.S. Eliot.

I am not too sure I knew what to do with every age, but I know that every age provided an opportunity for new learning and new friendships.

Seismic changes in all facets of life, certainly in religious life, have taken my journey as a sister in diverse directions. Initial assignments in teaching were enriching because I dealt with a variety of ages and also lived in communities where members supported one another. College teaching provided more flexibility and I was able to take a year’s sabbatical to study the art centers in Europe.

Establishing a volunteer center in Kansas City, followed by working with an international volunteer group, encouraged a global perspective.

When the invitation came from the U.S. Bishops to help the church in Eastern Europe after the fall of communism, my heart was ready. Partnerships with Eastern European sisters, and those from other countries who came also as volunteers, are one of the greatest gifts of my religious life.

My research for the Bakhita Initiative brought the resources of sisters focused on modern-day slavery together and created U.S. Catholic Sisters Against Human Trafficking. Working
with sisters throughout the world who are also engaged in this effort is strengthening our global ties as sisters in addressing the evil of slavery.

These last years in parish ministry in Belleville, Munden and Cuba, Kan., have reinforced my belief of the goodness of people — their willingness to sacrifice for their families but also for the Church. My intent has been to listen to God’s call and to minister, as best I can, locally in the parish, nationally with the network of sisters addressing trafficking, and globally, helping sisters write proposals for worthy causes.

As a member of the Sisters of St. Joseph, I have been free to do this.

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